Saturday, November 15, 2008

She's Here!!!

She's here, she's beautiful, and, already, she's VERY loved! Her parents are having to compete with her proud older brother and sister for any time with her! More pictures and details to come - we're simply too busy enjoying her right now!

Wednesday, November 12, 2008

Manna from Heaven

The past few days have been somewhat of a challenge for me. My two little darlings just got over a NASTY, TWO WEEK (!) bout with some THE WORST stomach flu I've ever known (and let me tell you, I don't like cleaning up vomit and diarrhea when I'm NOT pregnant, so this was NOT very special for me.) Aside from the cleaning and laundry, this has resulted in 2 weeks of sleepless nights, incessant whining, and carrying an extra 40 (sometimes 80) pounds around when the poor little dears were too sick to even walk - loads of fun for my back, I say. Mix in a good dose of nausea and heartburn, a terrible fall one night, a husband living at the hospital and several pretty hefty contractions and you have quite the treat for a 9-month-pregnant body. I hope I don't come across as complaining, because I write these things now, looking back, in jest and even with a smile on my face. But my message is one of hope and inspiration, a testimony of how grateful I am for Prophets, friends and blogs.

Today when I needed it most, I sat down to the computer for a quick second to do my daily perusing of blogs - I usually have only a couple of moments and check just a few blogs each day. As fortune would have it, I looked at the blog of an old college friend here and saw a post which was truly, to me, Manna from Heaven! (Thank you Jennie!!!) She discussed difficult moments as a mother and shared a talk by Elder Jeffrey R. Holland entitled Because She Is a Mother. (Due to the length, I have simply posted portions which really 'spoke' to me - but then entire talk is definitely worth reading! Click here!)

As I sat down and read, I was so moved I could not withold the tears and it felt good to let them flow freely. Thank you Jennie, Elder Holland and the modern day wonders of the internet!

"If you try your best to be the best parent you can be, you will have done all that a human being can do and all that God expects you to do.

There are some lines attributed to Victor Hugo which read:

“She broke the bread into two fragments and gave them to her children, who ate with eagerness. ‘She hath kept none for herself,’ grumbled the sergeant.

“ ‘Because she is not hungry,’ said a soldier.

“ ‘No,’ said the sergeant, ‘because she is a mother.’ ”

In speaking of mothers generally, I especially wish to praise and encourage young mothers. The work of a mother is hard, too often unheralded work. The young years are often those when either husband or wife—or both—may still be in school or in those earliest and leanest stages of developing the husband’s breadwinning capacities. Finances fluctuate daily between low and nonexistent. The apartment is usually decorated in one of two smart designs—Deseret Industries provincial or early Mother Hubbard. The car, if there is one, runs on smooth tires and an empty tank. But with night feedings and night teethings, often the greatest challenge of all for a young mother is simply fatigue. Through these years, mothers go longer on less sleep and give more to others with less personal renewal for themselves than any other group I know at any other time in life. It is not surprising when the shadows under their eyes sometimes vaguely resemble the state of Rhode Island.

Do the best you can through these years, but whatever else you do, cherish that role that is so uniquely yours and for which heaven itself sends angels to watch over you and your little ones. Husbands—especially husbands—as well as Church leaders and friends in every direction, be helpful and sensitive and wise. Remember, “To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven.” 6

Mothers, we acknowledge and esteem your faith in every footstep. Please know that it is worth it then, now, and forever. And if, for whatever reason, you are making this courageous effort alone, without your husband at your side, then our prayers will be all the greater for you, and our determination to lend a helping hand even more resolute.

One young mother wrote to me recently that her anxiety tended to come on three fronts. One was that whenever she heard talks on LDS motherhood, she worried because she felt she didn’t measure up or somehow wasn’t going to be equal to the task. Secondly, she felt like the world expected her to teach her children reading, writing, interior design, Latin, calculus, and the Internet—all before the baby said something terribly ordinary, like “goo goo.” Thirdly, she often felt people were sometimes patronizing, almost always without meaning to be, because the advice she got or even the compliments she received seemed to reflect nothing of the mental investment, the spiritual and emotional exertion, the long-night, long-day, stretched-to-the-limit demands that sometimes are required in trying to be and wanting to be the mother God hopes she will be.

But one thing, she said, keeps her going: “Through the thick and the thin of this, and through the occasional tears of it all, I know deep down inside I am doing God’s work. I know that in my motherhood I am in an eternal partnership with Him. I am deeply moved that God finds His ultimate purpose and meaning in being a parent, even if some of His children make Him weep.

“It is this realization,” she says, “that I try to recall on those inevitably difficult days when all of this can be a bit overwhelming. Maybe it is precisely our inability and anxiousness that urge us to reach out to Him and enhance His ability to reach back to us. Maybe He secretly hopes we will be anxious,” she said, “and will plead for His help. Then, I believe, He can teach these children directly, through us, but with no resistance offered. I like that idea,” she concludes. “It gives me hope. If I can be right before my Father in Heaven, perhaps His guidance to our children can be unimpeded. Maybe then it can be His work and His glory in a very literal sense.” 7

In light of that kind of expression, it is clear that some of those Rhode Island–sized shadows come not just from diapers and carpooling but from at least a few sleepless nights spent searching the soul, seeking earnestly for the capacity to raise these children to be what God wants them to be. Moved by that kind of devotion and determination, may I say to mothers collectively, in the name of the Lord, you are magnificent. You are doing terrifically well. The very fact that you have been given such a responsibility is everlasting evidence of the trust your Father in Heaven has in you. He knows that your giving birth to a child does not immediately propel you into the circle of the omniscient. If you and your husband will strive to love God and live the gospel yourselves; if you will plead for that guidance and comfort of the Holy Spirit promised to the faithful; if you will go to the temple to both make and claim the promises of the most sacred covenants a woman or man can make in this world; if you will show others, including your children, the same caring, compassionate, forgiving heart you want heaven to show you; if you try your best to be the best parent you can be, you will have done all that a human being can do and all that God expects you to do.

Yours is the grand tradition of Eve, the mother of all the human family, the one who understood that she and Adam had to fall in order that “men [and women] might be” 9 and that there would be joy. Yours is the grand tradition of Sarah and Rebekah and Rachel, without whom there could not have been those magnificent patriarchal promises to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob which bless us all. Yours is the grand tradition of Lois and Eunice and the mothers of the 2,000 stripling warriors. Yours is the grand tradition of Mary, chosen and foreordained from before this world was, to conceive, carry, and bear the Son of God Himself. We thank all of you, including our own mothers, and tell you there is nothing more important in this world than participating so directly in the work and glory of God, in bringing to pass the mortality and earthly life of His daughters and sons, so that immortality and eternal life can come in those celestial realms on high.

When you have come to the Lord in meekness and lowliness of heart and, as one mother said, “pounded on the doors of heaven to ask for, to plead for, to demand guidance and wisdom and help for this wondrous task,” that door is thrown open to provide you the influence and the help of all eternity. Claim the promises of the Savior of the world. Ask for the healing balm of the Atonement for whatever may be troubling you or your children. Know that in faith things will be made right in spite of you, or more correctly, because of you.

You can’t possibly do this alone, but you do have help. The Master of Heaven and Earth is there to bless you—He who resolutely goes after the lost sheep, sweeps thoroughly to find the lost coin, waits everlastingly for the return of the prodigal son. Yours is the work of salvation, and therefore you will be magnified, compensated, made more than you are and better than you have ever been as you try to make honest effort, however feeble you may sometimes feel that to be.

Remember, remember all the days of your motherhood: “Ye have not come thus far save it were by the word of Christ with unshaken faith in him, relying wholly upon the merits of him who is mighty to save.” 10

Rely on Him. Rely on Him heavily. Rely on Him forever. And “press forward with a steadfastness in Christ, having a perfect brightness of hope.” 11 You are doing God’s work. You are doing it wonderfully well. He is blessing you and He will bless you, even—no, especially—when your days and your nights may be the most challenging. Like the woman who anonymously, meekly, perhaps even with hesitation and some embarrassment, fought her way through the crowd just to touch the hem of the Master’s garment, so Christ will say to the women who worry and wonder and sometimes weep over their responsibility as mothers, “Daughter, be of good comfort; thy faith hath made thee whole.” 12 And it will make your children whole as well.

In the sacred and holy name of the Lord Jesus Christ, amen.

Thursday, November 06, 2008

A Lesson in Prayer from my two little Angels

Once upon a time, I would have told you I never wanted to have a second child, for fear he/she would take time away from the beautiful, perfect little daughter around whom my life revolved. But on days like today, I am SO grateful that my daughter got a sibling. Does she ever lose some of my attention on his account? Of course. But she gains SO much more - she gains a brother; a little blue-eyed, tow-headed wonder who adores her more than life itself, who (most of the time) worships the ground she walks on. She has gained someone to direct (aka BOSS) around, a shadow, a playmate, a cohort in crime, a best friend. And it brings me so much joy.

I LOVE when I am busy cleaning, cooking, or putting my feet up while eating bon-bons on the couch (ha ha!) and I overhear them playing. Of course, there are moments the playing develops into quarreling and I must intervene - but I try to stay out of them as much as possible because I simply love listening to them!!

Yesterday, Grins was trying with all his might to remove a toy from a tightly-wedged hiding place. When he started getting frustrated, his older sister said "It's OK, (Grins). Let's just say a prayer and Heavenly Father will help us." I then listened as she proceeded to utter a simple "Please help us get the toy" prayer, after which the toy was, of course, easily removed (who, especially a loving Father, could resist such a request?!) I sat there marvelling at these sweet little spirits with whom I spend my every waking moment. How truly blessed I am!

Monday, November 03, 2008

No baby yet.....I'm just growing a brain!

Could the last 2 weeks of pregnancy be any longer? And yet, I know whenever the 'big day' arrives, and we have entered the 'twilight zone' with our beloved little newborn, the pregnancy will have seemed to fly by and I'll look back and long for my nights of uninterrupted sleep and the ability to keep my shirt dry (you nursing mothers know what I'm talking about!).

Yesterday in church EVERYONE looked at me and said "What are you still doing here?!" "Where is that baby?" "Oh, you poor thing"...and so on. Which didn't make me feel all that special. Until one sweet sister said "You hang onto that baby as long as you can! Recent studies have shown that during the last 2 weeks of pregnancy the fetus' brain develops at exponential rates, and that each day is vital in the brain's development. Each day! It's worth it!!" While I've never heard of such a study, it really made me stop and think. Rather than search for a source to validate her claim, I am going to choose to believe these sage words simply to make these next few days/weeks seem 'worth it'. Rather than focus on my heartburn, my need to use the bathroom every 2 minutes and my aching back, I'm going to be grateful that I have a body that is able to conceive, nurture and bear healthy children so easily. And rather than be frustrated at being unable to plan anything in my life for the next month, I am going to enjoy the mystery of wondering what I'll be doing and where I'll be when my new little daughter will courageously leave the arms of her loving Heavenly Father to join our humble little family here on earth. I am going to recognize what an incredible and divine miracle I am taking part in - the miracle of life.

So, right now, I'm just growing my little girl a brain.